NEW Summer Activities for Kids!

Snowbasin Resort has added several fun activities for kids this summer!

Playground

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All new playground – free, always open and available to play on dawn – dusk!

Bounce Houses

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A different bounce house every weekend! Open Saturdays and Sundays 12 – 6 pm. Cost is $8 for an all day pass.

Spider Jump

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Jump over 20 feet into the air and perform gravity defying maneuvers, like flips and somersaults! Up to 4 people can jump at the same time!

The spider jump is open Saturday and Sunday 12 – 6 pm. Cost is $5 for a 5 minute session.

Strider Bikes

Biking the beginner area at Snowbasin as a family

Kids as young as 2 can use these Strider Bikes in our new kid – friendly practice bike course in the meadow ( between the Grizzly Center and Playground). Cost is $10 for all day rental.

Also, our Free Guided Tours can always be a fun time for little ones to learn more about our beautiful mountain!

Check out our guest blogger’s reviews of our new summer activities: Adventure for your Little Ones

Also a blog post about a fun hike with the kids: Rave Hike

 

 

 

Adventure for your Littles Ones: New Summer Activities for Kids at Snowbasin

Biking the beginner area at Snowbasin as a family

Exploring Snowbasin’s trail as a family. Our youngest on a Strider bike, available for rent or buy at the Grizzly Center.

As a parent, I’ve learned my fun is exponentially increased when my kids are having fun too. So I am quick to notice when a resort works hard to provide options that “spread-the-stoke” among my kids.

A few weeks ago we headed up to check out the new kid-friendly attractions at Snowbasin on the weekends.

If you missed my last post, here is a great family hike with amazing scenery: Rave Hike: A high alpine, flowering beauty for the whole family. But beyond hiking, here are some great activities for your kids to enjoy while you sit back and enjoy summertime at Blues, Brews, and BBQ!

1. Not a mountain biker? Still bring the kids’ bikes! 

The Skills park at Snowbasin

50 Feet from where we parked the car, we jumped immediately on the Needles Trail which begins with flat single track. The kids spun laps on the small skills park behind the Grizzly Center which is perfect for kids on balance bikes or older kids/adults looking to work on some new tricks. (Dad had fun too. :) )

Snowbasin has teamed up with Strider Bikes to get even the youngest riders (as young as age 2) out riding the trails. If you have younger kids and are new to the Strider Bike revolution or maybe unconvinced of their awesomeness, here is a post that follows my son as he learned to ride a bike at 22-months-old. Can your 22-month old ride a bike? Yes, they can.

My kids spent most their time racing around the loop, even more time than they did at the new playground. Which brings me to:

2. The new playground is a huge hit!

playground at Snowbasin

Designed to blend in with the mountain environment, the new playground is great for kids of all ages. The park resembles a log cabin, but with slides, monkey bars, bridges, and stepping-stones. There is a picnic table where you can have a snack or sack lunch.

3. New inflatable adventure features… a different one every weekend!

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Large, inflatable bounce houses where my kids can bounce their energy away? Yes, please! With different ones every weekend, they can have something to look forward to if you head on up multiple times this summer.

You can purchase a pass good for the ENTIRE day for $8 in the Grizzly Center.

We had a fantastic day up at Snowbasin biking as a family and enjoying quality time in the sun. Smiles all around!

 

 

5 Safety Tips For Families On the Slopes

Tips for Successful Family Skiing

Every fantastic adventure is made successful (in part) by abiding certain guidelines. For instance, backcountry skiers require knowledge of terrain, avalanche conditions, and rescue for a successful day.

But what about a simple family trip up to a resort? We’ve found the same goes for families and our in-bounds ski/snowboarding adventures. As our kids have progressed beyond the bunny slope, we’ve found it helpful and somewhat necessary to set some guidelines. Below are rules that everyone, kid and parent, should know.

1. Set a meeting place.

This is a great tip for large groups and families. Set a meeting place in a centralized location just incase you lose someone. It is incredibly easy, especially on busy weekends, to lose your kid or your friend. Before you even jump on the lift, make plans for lunch (time/place) so everyone can reconnect. Do the same thing for the end of the day. Don’t rely on cell phones! There have been many times where I lost service, or battery power, and wished I’d relied on “old-school” principles.

2. Discuss with your kids a safe place to stop on a run.

Kids (and beginners) do not naturally know where/when it is safe to stop and when it is not. This can be an abstract concept to explain but here a few tips:

  • Stop on the side of runs, not the middle.
  • Stop before you drop below a hill, not just after.
  • Be aware of skiers to the sides and behind you, before coming to a quick stop.
  • If you can see the uphill skiers above you, then there is a good chance they can see you.

3.Know the rules in Terrain Parks

I love, love, love that they are making terrain parks for kids and beginners, not just the experts. My kids spend hours flying off the jumps and attempting rails. But there are certain ‘rules’ that many kids are not aware of.

For instance, they should stop at the top of the terrain park and wait in line for their turn. Not just blow through unaware of the other riders waiting.

They should also be aware of signals they might see and/or use. Arms crossed if a skier is down, arms in a circle if it is safe to proceed. If your kids are really young, stay with them in the terrain park so you can signal to other riders if they fall in a blind spot. I had to do this once or an adult rider would have landed on my 5-year-old son had I not thrown up the “crossed-arms” signal.

Terrain Park Rules, Kids should know

4. Discuss ways to cross a run and looking for uphill traffic.

Unlike crossing the street, the skier who is crossing a run does not have the right-of-way. In fact, the uphill skier does. But I cannot tell you how many times my kids have (and still do) charge into a run, completely unaware of riders coming down at them.

I like to think of this like crossing a street. Stop. Look. Proceed with caution.

5. Help your kids identify “safe strangers.”

This tip piggy-backs off our first point, set a meeting place. But what if you forget too? What if you never meet up? What if you lose a kid?

My husband and I spend some time asking them who is safe to ask for help should they become injured or separated from us. Ski Patrollers, Lift Operations and Guest Services workers are great examples of “safe strangers.” And at many resorts, these people have noticeable jackets or uniforms making them easy to spot. Help your kids become acquainted with resort employees should they need them at some point.

Guest Services at Snowbasin

A few simple tips and rules, can save you time, hassle, and worry when exploring the slopes with your kids and friends.

What are your tips?